Dog Collars, Leads, Harnesses & Muzzles

Categories

Collars & Halters

Leashes & Leash Accessories

Harnesses

Muzzles

ID Tags

Tie Outs

Shop All Dog Collars, Leads, Harnesses & Muzzles

💡 Tip: Use the filters to narrow down the range!

Dog Collars, Leads, Harnesses & Muzzles

Dog Collars, Leads, Harnesses & Muzzles

When it comes to walking our canine companions, the debate over the best equipment is never-ending. Let's delve into the advantages and disadvantages of three popular choices: collars, halters (or head collars), and harnesses.

Collars: Essential for holding ID tags and for emergency control, collars are a staple. However, they come with significant downsides, especially for dogs that haven't mastered leash manners. Studies have highlighted the risks of neck injuries from jerking or prolonged pulling. These injuries can range from bruising to more severe issues like crushed trachea and fractured vertebrae. Additionally, collars can increase eye pressure and cause damage to the throat, potentially leading to broader health issues.

Halters/Head Collars: While offering better control over pulling dogs, head collars must be used with caution. Incorrect use can lead to neck injuries similar to those caused by traditional collars. It's crucial to introduce the head collar gently and pair it with a well-fitted harness and double-ended lead for the safest and most effective control.

Harnesses: Often seen as the safer alternative, harnesses can also pose problems if not properly fitted. Some designs, particularly "no-pull" harnesses, can restrict shoulder movement and cause long-term damage. Finding the right harness requires attention to your dog's body shape and some trial and error to ensure a perfect fit.

When it comes to walking our canine companions, the debate over the best equipment is never-ending. Let's delve into the advantages and disadvantages of three popular choices: collars, halters (or head collars), and harnesses.

Collars: Essential for holding ID tags and for emergency control, collars are a staple. However, they come with significant downsides, especially for dogs that haven't mastered leash manners. Studies have highlighted the risks of neck injuries from jerking or prolonged pulling. These injuries can range from bruising to more severe issues like crushed trachea and fractured vertebrae. Additionally, collars can increase eye pressure and cause damage to the throat, potentially leading to broader health issues.

Halters/Head Collars: While offering better control over pulling dogs, head collars must be used with caution. Incorrect use can lead to neck injuries similar to those caused by traditional collars. It's crucial to introduce the head collar gently and pair it with a well-fitted harness and double-ended lead for the safest and most effective control.

Harnesses: Often seen as the safer alternative, harnesses can also pose problems if not properly fitted. Some designs, particularly "no-pull" harnesses, can restrict shoulder movement and cause long-term damage. Finding the right harness requires attention to your dog's body shape and some trial and error to ensure a perfect fit.